Secret NY Times Features?!?

Transient

When I was in 6th grade, one of the other home-room teachers gave current events pop-quizzes all the time.  The way to be prepared for these quizzes was to read the inside of the front page of the New York Times where there is a brief summary of the major news stories of the day.  That wasn't my teacher so I didn't really come to appreciate this amazing cliffs-notes of news 'till much later, but appreciate it I did.  Of course you don't want to only read the cliffs-notes of anything, but when time is tight, I'd rather have a little bit of a clue about what's happening in the world than none at all.

More recently, I stumbled across two great features from the New York Times online: Your [day of the week] Briefing and New York Today,  As you might surmise, the former provides a round-up of national and international news of interest and the latter does the same for the NY region.  I figured I was the last to know about these but, after speaking to some smart, news-savvy people recently who weren't aware of them, I figured I should let everyone know!

These columns can be tricky to find and I think that's why more people aren't aware of them.  I generally read them on the NY Times app on my phone in the morning and they show up in the Top Stories column, but once you get towards noon, they disappear from the Top Stories feed.  New York Today lives on in the New York section but the only way I've been able to find the daily briefing is by going to the website and doing a search.  Here are today's Your Tuesday Briefing and New York Today so that you can take a look.

But wait! There's more!

  • The NY Times recently rolled out a new feature that's similar to the two above in boiling down the top issues/events but with a focus on politics.  It's a bit longer and more in-depth as well.  The Upshot.
  • While looking for a better way to direct you to Your [day of the week] briefing, I stumbled on Your Evening Briefing which I'd never seen before.  I can't really vouch for it except to say, if you're a night owl, maybe keep an eye out.  Here's Tonight's.

Thanks, New York Times!

There are LOTS of problems with the news and with news coverage but I'm always glad to be more informed rather than less and I appreciate the occasional short-cut.